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Parkinson’s – Discussion Group and Education Series – June 22, 2022

 Alzheimer’s was the first topic of discussion. Patrick relayed the story of a client Carol who had Alzheimer’s but could learn new lyrics while singing. She also had long term memory of music and could recall common songs. Patrick talked about the importance of exercise and the diverse types that people find that work for them.

Feet The discussion then turned to feet. It became clear that foot problems were common in PWP. Bunions were universally experienced. Some spoke of painful cramping and distortion of the toes, which is called Dystonia and quite common in PWP. New Balance shoes were highly recommended by group members.

Blood Pressure Group members actively participated in a discussion about blood pressure.

Normal blood pressure is vital to life. Without the pressure that forces our blood to flow around the circulatory system, no oxygen or nutrients would be delivered through our arteries to the tissues and organs.

Your blood pressure is recorded as two numbers:

Systolic blood pressure (the top number) – indicates how much pressure your blood is exerting against your artery walls when the heart beats.

Diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) – indicates how much pressure your blood is exerting against your artery walls while the heart is resting between beats.

Normal blood pressure is defined as < 120 and < 80. More attention is generally given to systolic blood pressure (the top number) as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease for people over fifty. However, either an elevated systolic or an elevated diastolic blood pressure reading may be used to make a diagnosis of high blood pressure. High blood pressure usually has no warning signs or symptoms.

Many people do not know they have high blood pressure. Measuring your blood pressure is the only way to know whether you have high blood pressure.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

Orthostatic hypertension – a sudden and abrupt increase in blood pressure when a person stands up. Orthostatic hypertension is diagnosed by a rise in systolic BP of 20 mmHg or more when standing.

Orthostatic hypotension – also known as postural hypotension – is a form of low blood pressure that happens when standing after sitting or lying down. Orthostatic hypotension can cause dizziness or lightheadedness and possibly fainting.

Maximum Heart Rate (MHR)

Your maximum heart rate is the age-related number of beats per minute of the heart, when working at its maximum. MHR = (220 – age)

Target Heart Rate Your target heart rate is a range of numbers that reflect how fast your heart should be beating when you exercise. Target heart rate is expressed as a percentage (usually between 50 percent and 85 percent) of your maximum safe heart rate.

For moderate-intensity physical activity, your target heart rate should be between 64% and 76% of MHR.

For vigorous-intensity physical activity, your target heart rate should be between 77% and 93% of MHR.

Exercise:

Adults need 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity and 2 days of muscle strengthening activity each week according to the current CDC Guidelines. You do not have to do it all at once. It could be 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. You can spread your activity out during the week and/or break it up into smaller chunks of time.

Types of Exercise:

Aerobic: Cross-country skiing, swimming, running/jogging, outdoor cycling, walking, elliptical trainer, rowing.

Strength: Lifting weights, resistance bands, heavy gardening, climbing stairs, hill walking, cycling, dance, push-ups, sit-ups, squats.

Skill-based: tennis, yoga, non-contact boxing, playing catch, jumping rope, juggling, dribbling a ball, throwing objects at specific targets.

Balance: Balance on one leg, raising the other leg to the side or behind; putting heel in front of your toe, like walking a tightrope; standing up and sitting down from a chair without using your hands; walking while alternating knee lifts with each step; and tai chi.

Patrick’s Five Pillars

  1. Doctor Team
  2. Nutrition
  3. Exercise
  4. Sleep
  5. Mental Health/Socialization

 

 

 

 

Resources

 

New Balance

https://www.newbalance.com/?ecid=ps_Google_new%20balance%20sneakers_e_652894748_1161&gclid=CjwKCAjw2f-VBhAsEiwAO4lNeKXlT8E-

American Heart Association

https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/high-blood-pressure/understanding-blood-pressure-readings

CDC

https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/adults/index.htm

PD Warrior

https://pdwarrior.com/

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